British Literature Exam Vocabulary

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75 Cards. Created by Kate ().
 
Term  
Definition

Ode

a serious, often intensely emotional poem that pays respect to a person or thing. In an ode, the speaker directly addresses the object

Elegy

a solemn and formal poem about death. It may mourn a person or a more abstract loss, such as the passing of youth

Sonnet

a 14-line poem with a specific meter and rhyme scheme

Simile

comparing two apparently unlike things, using like or as

Metaphor

comparing two apparently unlike things, without using like or as

Personification

giving human traits to something nonhuman

Oxymoron

juxtaposing two opposite or contradictory words that reveal an interesting truth

Repetition

repeated use of sounds, words, phrases, or sentences. Poets use repetition for emphasis as well as to create a musical effect

Alliteration

repetition of initial consonant sounds

Consonance

repetition of final consonance sounds

Assonance

repetition of similar vowel sounds

Rhyme

repetition of sounds at the ends of words. End Rhyme is the most common type of rhyme, which occurs when rhyming words appear at the ends of lines

Onomatopoeia

use of words that imitate sounds (ring, boom, growl)

Internal Rhyme

the use of rhymes within a poetic line

Caesuras

rhythmic breaks in the middle of lines, where the reciter could pause for a breath

Kennings

two-word poetic renamings of people, places, and things

Pastoral Poetry

celebrates the pleasures of simple life in the country

Arable

suitable for cultivation of land

Litany

any long, repetitive, or dull recital

Moratorium

a suspension of activity; an authorized delay